Positive Definite Quadratic Forms

I’m reading through Primes of the Form {x^2+ny^2}, by David Cox (link; it’s good!). Here are the high-level notes I took on the first chapter, which is about the theory of quadratic forms.

(Meta point re blog: I’m probably going to start posting more and more of these more high-level notes/sketches on this blog on topics that I’ve been just learning. Up til now I’ve been mostly only posting things that I understand well and for which I have a very polished exposition. But the perfect is the enemy of the good here; given that I’m taking these notes for my own sake, I may as well share them to help others.)

1. Overview

Definition 1

For us a quadratic form is a polynomial {Q = Q(x,y) = ax^2 + bxy + cy^2}, where {a}, {b}, {c} are some integers. We say that it is primitive if {\gcd(a,b,c) = 1}.

For example, we have the famous quadratic form

\displaystyle  Q_{\text{Fermat}}(x,y) = x^2+y^2.

As readers are probably aware, we can say a lot about exactly which integers can be represented by {Q_{\text{Fermat}}}: by Fermat’s Christmas theorem, the primes {p \equiv 1 \pmod 4} (and {p=2}) can all be written as the sum of two squares, while the primes {p \equiv 3 \pmod 4} cannot. For convenience, let us say that:

Definition 2

Let {Q} be a quadratic form. We say it represents the integer {m} if there exists {x,y \in \mathbb Z} with {m = Q(x,y)}. Moreover, {Q} properly represents {m} if one can find such {x} and {y} which are also relatively prime.

The basic question is: what can we say about which primes/integers are properly represented by a quadratic form? In fact, we will later restrict our attention to “positive definite” forms (described later).

For example, Fermat’s Christmas theorem now rewrites as:

Theorem 3 (Fermat’s Christmas theorem for primes)

An odd prime {p} is (properly) represented by {Q_{\text{Fermat}}} if and only if {p \equiv 1 \pmod 4}.

The proof of this is classical, see for example my olympiad handout. We also have the formulation for odd integers:

Theorem 4 (Fermat’s Christmas theorem for odd integers)

An odd integer {m} is properly represented by {Q_{\text{Fermat}}} if and only if all prime factors of {m} are {1 \pmod 4}.

Proof: For the “if” direction, we use the fact that {Q_{\text{Fermat}}} is multiplicative in the sense that

\displaystyle  (x^2+y^2)(u^2+v^2) = (xu \pm yv)^2 + (xv \mp yu)^2.

For the “only if” part we use the fact that if a multiple of a prime {p} is properly represented by {Q_{\text{Fermat}}}, then so is {p}. This follows by noticing that if {x^2+y^2 \equiv 0 \pmod p} (and {xy \not\equiv 0 \pmod p}) then {(x/y)^2 \equiv -1 \pmod p}. \Box
Tangential remark: the two ideas in the proof will grow up in the following way.

  • The fact that {Q_{\text{Fermat}}} “multiplies nicely” will grow up to become the so-called composition of quadratic forms.
  • The second fact will not generalize for an arbitrary form {Q}. Instead, we will see that if a multiple of {p} is represented by a form {Q} then some form of the same “discriminant” will represent the prime {p}, but this form need not be the same as {Q} itself.

2. Equivalence of forms, and the discriminant

The first thing we should do is figure out when two forms are essentially the same: for example, {x^2+5y^2} and {5x^2+y^2} should clearly be considered the same. More generally, if we think of {Q} as acting on {\mathbb Z^{\oplus 2}} and {T} is any automorphism of {\mathbb Z^{\oplus 2}}, then {Q \circ T} should be considered the same as {Q}. Specifically,

Definition 5

Two forms {Q_1} and {Q_2} said to be equivalent if there exists

\displaystyle  T = \begin{pmatrix} p & q \\ r & s \end{pmatrix} \in \text{GL }(2,\mathbb Z)

such that {Q_2(x,y) = Q_1(px+ry, qx+sy)}. We have {\det T = ps-qr = \pm 1} and so we say the equivalence is

  • a proper equivalence if {\det T = +1}, and
  • an improper equivalence if {\det T = -1}.

So we generally will only care about forms up to proper equivalence. (It will be useful to distinguish between proper/improper equivalence later.)

Naturally we seek some invariants under this operation. By far the most important is:

Definition 6

The discriminant of a quadratic form {Q = ax^2 + bxy + cy^2} is defined as

\displaystyle  D = b^2-4ac.

The discriminant is invariant under equivalence (check this). Note also that we also have {D \equiv 0 , 1 \pmod 4}.

Observe that we have

\displaystyle  4a \cdot (ax^2+bxy+cy^2) = (2ax + by)^2 - Dy^2.

So if {D < 0} and {a > 0} (thus {c > 0} too) then {ax^2+bxy+cy^2 > 0} for all {x,y > 0}. Such quadratic forms are called positive definite, and we will restrict our attention to these forms.

Now that we have this invariant, we may as well classify equivalence classes of quadratic forms for a fixed discriminant. It turns out this can be done explicitly.

Definition 7

A quadratic form {Q = ax^2 + bxy + cy^2} is reduced if

  • it is primitive and positive definite,
  • {|b| \le a \le c}, and
  • {b \ge 0} if either {|b| = a} or {a = c}.

Exercise 8

Check there only finitely many reduced forms of a fixed discriminant.

Then the big huge theorem is:

Theorem 9 (Reduced forms give a set of representatives)

Every primitive positive definite form {Q} of discriminant is properly equivalent to a unique reduced form. We call this the reduction of {Q}.

Proof: Omitted due to length, but completely elementary. It is a reduction argument with some number of cases. \Box

Thus, for any discriminant {D} we can consider the set

\displaystyle  \text{Cl}(D) = \left\{ \text{reduced forms of discriminant } D \right\}

which will be the equivalence classes of positive definite of discriminant {D}. By abuse of notation we will also consider it as the set of equivalence classes of primitive positive definite forms of discriminant {D}.

We also define {h(D) = \left\lvert \text{Cl}(D) \right\rvert}; by the exercise, {h(D) < \infty}. This is called the class number.

Moreover, we have {h(D) \ge 1}, because we can take {x^2 - D/4 y^2} for {D \equiv 0 \pmod 4} and {x^2 + xy + (1-D)/4 y^2} for {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4}. We call this form the principal form.

3. Tables of quadratic forms

Example 10 (Examples of quadratic forms with {h(D) = 1}, {D \equiv 0 \pmod 4})

The following discriminants have class number {h(D) = 1}, hence having only the principal form:

  • {D = -4}, with form {x^2 + y^2}.
  • {D = -8}, with form {x^2 + 2y^2}.
  • {D = -12}, with form {x^2+3y^2}.
  • {D = -16}, with form {x^2 + 4y^2}.
  • {D = -28}, with form {x^2 + 7y^2}.

This is in fact the complete list when {D \equiv 0 \pmod 4}.

Example 11 (Examples of quadratic forms with {h(D) = 1}, {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4})

The following discriminants have class number {h(D) = 1}, hence having only the principal form:

  • {D = -3}, with form {x^2 + xy + y^2}.
  • {D = -7}, with form {x^2 + xy + 2y^2}.
  • {D = -11}, with form {x^2 + xy + 3y^2}.
  • {D = -19}, with form {x^2 + xy + 5y^2}.
  • {D = -27}, with form {x^2 + xy + 7y^2}.
  • {D = -43}, with form {x^2 + xy + 11y^2}.
  • {D = -67}, with form {x^2 + xy + 17y^2}.
  • {D = -163}, with form {x^2 + xy + 41y^2}.

This is in fact the complete list when {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4}.

Example 12 (More examples of quadratic forms)

Here are tables for small discriminants with {h(D) > 1}. When {D \equiv 0 \pmod 4} we have

  • {D = -20}, with {h(D) = 2} forms {2x^2 + 2xy + 3y^2} and {x^2 + 5y^2}.
  • {D = -24}, with {h(D) = 2} forms {2x^2 + 3y^2} and {x^2 + 6y^2}.
  • {D = -32}, with {h(D) = 2} forms {3x^2 + 2xy + 3y^2} and {x^2 + 8y^2}.
  • {D = -36}, with {h(D) = 2} forms {2x^2 + 2xy + 5y^2} and {x^2 + 9y^2}.
  • {D = -40}, with {h(D) = 2} forms {2x^2 + 5y^2} and {x^2 + 10y^2}.
  • {D = -44}, with {h(D) = 3} forms {3x^2 \pm 2xy + 4y^2} and {x^2 + 11y^2}.

As for {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4} we have

  • {D = -15}, with {h(D) = 2} forms {2x^2 + xy + 2y^2} and {x^2 + xy + 4y^2}.
  • {D = -23}, with {h(D) = 3} forms {2x^2 \pm xy + 3y^2} and {x^2+ xy + 6y^2}.
  • {D = -31}, with {h(D) = 3} forms {2x^2 \pm xy + 4} and {x^2 + xy + 8y^2}.
  • {D = -39}, with {h(D) = 4} forms {3x^2 + 3xy + 4y^2}, {2x^2 \pm 2xy + 5y^2} and {x^2 + xy + 10y^2}.

Example 13 (Even More Examples of quadratic forms)

Here are some more selected examples:

  • {D = -56} has {h(D) = 4} forms {x^2+14y^2}, {2x^2+7y^2} and {3x^2 \pm 2xy + 5y^2}.
  • {D = -108} has {h(D) = 3} forms {x^2+27y^2} and {4x^2 \pm 2xy + 7y^2}.
  • {D = -256} has {h(D) = 4} forms {x^2+64y^2}, {4x^2+4xy+17y^2} and {5x^2\pm2xy+13y^2}.

4. The Character {\chi_D}

We can now connect this to primes {p} as follows. Earlier we played with {Q_{\text{Fermat}} = x^2+y^2}, and observed that for odd primes {p}, {p \equiv 1 \pmod 4} if and only if some multiple of {p} is properly represented by {Q_{\text{Fermat}}}.

Our generalization is as follows:

Theorem 14 (Primes represented by some quadratic form)

Let {D < 0} be a discriminant, and let {p \nmid D} be an odd prime. Then the following are equivalent:

  • {\left( \frac Dp \right) = 1}, i.e. {D} is a quadratic residue modulo {p}.
  • The prime {p} is (properly) represented by some reduced quadratic form in {\text{Cl}(D)}.

This generalizes our result for {Q_{\text{Fermat}}}, but note that it uses {h(-4) = 1} in an essential way! That is: if {(-1/p) = 1}, we know {p} is represented by some quadratic form of discriminant {D = -4}\dots but only since {h(-4) = 1} do we know that this form reduces to {Q_{\text{Fermat}} = x^2+y^2}.

Proof: First assume WLOG that {p \nmid 4a} and {Q(x,y) \equiv 0 \pmod p}. Thus {p \nmid y}, since otherwise this would imply {x \equiv y \equiv 0 \pmod p}. Then

\displaystyle  0 \equiv 4a \cdot Q(x,y) \equiv (2ax + by)^2 - Dy^2 \pmod p

hence {D \equiv \left( 2axy^{-1} + b \right)^2 \pmod p}.

The converse direction is amusing: let {m^2 = D + pk} for integers {m}, {k}. Consider the quadratic form

\displaystyle  Q(x,y) = px^2 + mxy + ky^2.

It is primitive of discriminant {D} and {Q(1,0) = p}. Now {Q} may not be reduced, but that’s fine: just take the reduction of {Q}, which must also properly represent {p}. \Box

Thus to every discriminant {D < 0} we can attach the Legendre character (is that the name?), which is a homomorphism

\displaystyle  \chi_D = \left( \tfrac{D}{\bullet} \right) : \left( \mathbb Z / D\mathbb Z \right)^\times \rightarrow \{ \pm 1 \}

with the property that if {p} is a rational prime not dividing {D}, then {\chi_D(p) = \left( \frac{D}{p} \right)}. This is abuse of notation since I should technically write {\chi_D(p \pmod D)}, but there is no harm done: one can check by quadratic reciprocity that if {p \equiv q \pmod D} then {\chi_D(p) = \chi_D(q)}. Thus our previous result becomes:

Theorem 15 ({\ker(\chi_D)} consists of representable primes)

Let {p \nmid D} be prime. Then {p \in \ker(\chi_D)} if and only if some quadratic form in {\text{Cl}(D)} represents {p}.

As a corollary of this, using the fact that {h(-8) = h(-12) = h(-28) = 1} one can prove that

Corollary 16 (Fermat-type results for {h(-4n) = 1})

Let {p > 7} be a prime. Then {p} is

  • of the form {x^2 + 2y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1, 3 \pmod 8}.
  • of the form {x^2 + 3y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3}.
  • of the form {x^2 + 7y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1, 2, 4 \pmod 7}.

Proof: The congruence conditions are equivalent to {(-4n/p) = 1}, and as before the only point is that the only reduced quadratic form for these {D = -4n} is the principal one. \Box

5. Genus theory

What if {h(D) > 1}? Sometimes, we can still figure out which primes go where just by taking mods.

Let {Q \in \text{Cl}(D)}. Then it represents some residue classes of {(\mathbb Z/D\mathbb Z)^\times}. In that case we call the set of residue classes represented the genus of the quadratic form {Q}.

Example 17 (Genus theory of {D = -20})

Consider {D = -20}, with

\displaystyle  \ker(\chi_D) = \left\{ 1, 3, 7, 9 \right\} \subseteq (\mathbb Z/D\mathbb Z)^\times.

We consider the two elements of {\text{Cl}(D)}:

  • {x^2 + 5y^2} represents {1, 9 \in (\mathbb Z/20\mathbb Z)^\times}.
  • {2x^2+2xy+3y^2} represents {3, 7 \in (\mathbb Z/20\mathbb Z)^\times}.

Now suppose for example that {p \equiv 9 \pmod{20}}. It must be represented by one of these two quadratic forms, but the latter form is never {9 \pmod{20}} and so it must be the first one. Thus we conclude that

  • {p = x^2+5y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1, 9 \pmod{20}}.
  • {p = 2x^2 + 2xy + 3y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 3, 7 \pmod{20}}.

The thing that makes this work is that each genus appears exactly once. We are not always so lucky: for example when {D = -108} we have that

Example 18 (Genus theory of {D = -108})

The two elements of {\text{Cl}(-108)} are:

  • {x^2+27y^2}, which represents exactly the {1 \pmod 3} elements of {(\mathbb Z/D\mathbb Z)^\times}.
  • {4x^2 \pm 2xy + 7y^2}, which also represents exactly the {1 \pmod 3} elements of {(\mathbb Z/D\mathbb Z)^\times}.

So the best we can conclude is that {p = x^2+27y^2} OR {p = 4x^2\pm2xy+7y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3} This is because the two distinct quadratic forms of discriminant {-108} happen to have the same genus.

We now prove that:

Theorem 19 (Genii are cosets of {\ker(\chi_D)})

Let {D} be a discriminant and consider the Legendre character {\chi_D}.

  • The genus of the principal form of discriminant {D} constitutes a subgroup {H} of {\ker(\chi_D)}, which we call the principal genus.
  • Any genus of a quadratic form in {\text{Cl}(D)} is a coset of the principal genus {H} in {\ker(\chi_D)}.

Proof: For the first part, we aim to show {H} is multiplicatively closed. For {D \equiv 0 \pmod 4}, {D = -4n} we use the fact that

\displaystyle  (x^2+ny^2)(u^2+nv^2) = (xu \pm nyv)^2 + n(xv \mp yu)^2.

For {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4}, we instead appeal to another “magic” identity

\displaystyle  4\left( x^2+xy+\frac{1-D}{4}y^2 \right) \equiv (2x+y)^2 \pmod D

and it follows from here that {H} is actually the set of squares in {(\mathbb Z/D\mathbb Z)^\times}, which is obviously a subgroup.

Now we show that other quadratic forms have genus equal to a coset of the principal genus. For {D \equiv 0 \pmod 4}, with {D = -4n} we can write

\displaystyle  a(ax^2+bxy+cy^2) = (ax+b/2 y)^2 + ny^2

and thus the desired coset is shown to be {a^{-1} H}. As for {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4}, we have

\displaystyle  4a \cdot (ax^2+bxy+cy^2) = (2ax + by)^2 - Dy^2 \equiv (2ax+by)^2 \pmod D

so the desired coset is also {a^{-1} H}, since {H} was the set of squares. \Box

Thus every genus is a coset of {H} in {\ker(\chi_D)}. Thus:

Definition 20

We define the quotient group

\displaystyle  \text{Gen}(D) = \ker(\chi_D) / H

which is the set of all genuses in discriminant {D}. One can view this as an abelian group by coset multiplication.

Thus there is a natural map

\displaystyle  \Phi_D : \text{Cl}(D) \twoheadrightarrow \text{Gen}(D).

(The map is surjective by Theorem~14.) We also remark than {\text{Gen}(D)} is quite well-behaved:

Proposition 21 (Structure of {\text{Gen}(D)})

The group {\text{Gen}(D)} is isomorphic to {(\mathbb Z/2\mathbb Z)^{\oplus m}} for some integer {m}.

Proof: Observe that {H} contains all the squares of {\ker(\chi_D)}: if {f} is the principal form then {f(t,0) = t^2}. Thus claim each element of {\text{Gen}(D)} has order at most {2}, which implies the result since {\text{Gen}(D)} is a finite abelian group. \Box

In fact, one can compute the order of {\text{Gen}(D)} exactly, but for this post I Will just state the result.

Theorem 22 (Order of {\text{Gen}(D)})

Let {D < 0} be a discriminant, and let {r} be the number of distinct odd primes which divide {D}. Define {\mu} by:

  • {\mu = r} if {D \equiv 1 \pmod 4}.
  • {\mu = r} if {D = -4n} and {n \equiv 3 \pmod 4}.
  • {\mu = r+1} if {D = -4n} and {n \equiv 1,2 \pmod 4}.
  • {\mu = r+1} if {D = -4n} and {n \equiv 4 \pmod 8}.
  • {\mu = r+2} if {D = -4n} and {n \equiv 0 \pmod 8}.

Then {\left\lvert \text{Gen}(D) \right\rvert = 2^{\mu-1}}.

6. Composition

We have already used once the nice identity

\displaystyle  (x^2+ny^2)(u^2+nv^2) = (xu \pm nyv)^2 + n(xv \mp yu)^2.

We are going to try and generalize this for any two quadratic forms in {\text{Cl}(D)}. Specifically,

Proposition 23 (Composition defines a group operation)

Let {f,g \in \text{Cl}(D)}. Then there is a unique {h \in \text{Cl}(D)} and bilinear forms {B_i(x,y,z,w) = a_ixz + b_ixw + c_iyz + d_iyw} for {i=1,2} such that

  • {f(x,y) g(z,w) = h(B_1(x,y,z,w), B_2(x,y,z,w))}.
  • {a_1b_2 - a_2b_1 = +f(1,0)}.
  • {a_1c_2 - a_2c_1 = +g(1,0)}.

In fact, without the latter two constraints we would instead have {a_1b_2 - a_2b_1 = \pm f(1,0)} and {a_1c_2 - a_2c_1 = \pm g(1,0)}, and each choice of signs would yield one of four (possibly different) forms. So requiring both signs to be positive makes this operation well-defined. (This is why we like proper equivalence; it gives us a well-defined group structure, whereas with improper equivalence it would be impossible to put a group structure on the forms above.)

Taking this for granted, we then have that

Theorem 24 (Form class group)

Let {D \equiv 0, 1 \pmod 4}, {D < 0} be a discriminant. Then {\text{Cl}(D)} becomes an abelian group under composition, where

  • The identity of {\text{Cl}(D)} is the principal form, and
  • The inverse of the form {ax^2+bxy+cy^2} is {ax^2-bxy+cy^2}.

This group is called the form class group.

We then have a group homomorphism

\displaystyle  \Phi_D : \text{Cl}(D) \twoheadrightarrow \text{Gen}(D).

Observe that {ax^2 + bxy + cy^2} and {ax^2 - bxy + cy^2} are inverses and that their {\Phi_D} images coincide (being improperly equivalent); this is expressed in the fact that {\text{Gen}(D)} has elements of order {\le 2}. As another corollary, the number of elements of {\text{Cl}(D)} with a given genus is always a power of two.

We now define:

Definition 25

An integer {n \ge 1} is convenient if the following equivalent conditions hold:

  • The principal form {x^2+ny^2} is the only reduced form with the principal genus.
  • {\Phi_D} is injective (hence an isomorphism).
  • {\left\lvert h(D) \right\rvert = 2^{\mu-1}}.

Thus we arrive at the following corollary:

Corollary 26 (Convenient numbers have nice representations)

Let {n \ge 1} be convenient. Then {p} is of the form {x^2+ny^2} if and only if {p} lies in the principal genus.

Hence the represent-ability depends only on {p \pmod{4n}}.

OEIS A000926 lists 65 convenient numbers. This sequence is known to be complete except for at most one more number; moreover the list is complete assuming the Grand Riemann Hypothesis.

7. Cubic and quartic reciprocity

To treat the cases where {n} is not convenient, the correct thing to do is develop class field theory. However, we can still make a little bit more progress if we bring higher reciprocity theorems to bear: we’ll handle the cases {n=27} and {n=64}, two examples of numbers which are not convenient.

7.1. Cubic reciprocity

First, we prove that

Theorem 27 (On {p = x^2+27y^2})

A prime {p > 3} is of the form {x^2+27y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3} and {2} is a cubic residue modulo {p}.

To do this we use cubic reciprocity, which requires working in the Eisenstein integers {\mathbb Z[\omega]} where {\omega} is a cube root of unity. There are six units in {\mathbb Z[\omega]} (the sixth roots of unity), hence each nonzero number has six associates (differing by a unit), and the ring is in fact a PID.

Now if we let {\pi} be a prime not dividing {3}, and {\alpha} is coprime to {\pi}, then we can define the cubic Legendre symbol by setting

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{\alpha}{\pi} \right)_3 \equiv \alpha^{\frac13(N\pi-1)} \pmod \pi \in \left\{ 1, \omega, \omega^2 \right\}.

Moreover, we can define a primary prime {\pi \nmid 3} to be one such that {\pi \equiv -1 \pmod 3}; given any prime exactly one of the six associates is primary. We then have the following reciprocity theorem:

Theorem 28 (Cubic reciprocity)

If {\pi} and {\theta} are disjoint primary primes in {\mathbb Z[\omega]} then

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{\pi}{\theta} \right)_3 = \left( \frac{\theta}{\pi} \right)_3.

We also have the following supplementary laws: if {\pi = (3m-1) + 3n\omega}, then

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{\omega}{\pi} \right)_3 = \omega^{m+n} \qquad\text{and}\qquad \left( \frac{1-\omega}{\pi} \right)_3 = \omega^{2m}.

The first supplementary law is for the unit (analogous to {(-1/p)}) while the second reciprocity law handles the prime divisors of {3 = -\omega^2(1-\omega)^2} (analogous to {(2/p)}.)

We can tie this back into {\mathbb Z} as follows. If {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3} is a rational prime then it is represented by {x^2+xy+y^2}, and thus we can put {p = \pi \overline{\pi}} for some prime {\pi}, {N(\pi) = p}. Consequently, we have a natural isomorphism

\displaystyle  \mathbb Z[\omega] / \pi \mathbb Z[\omega] \cong \mathbb Z / p \mathbb Z.

Therefore, we see that a given {a \in (\mathbb Z/p\mathbb Z)^\times} is a cubic residue if and only if {(\alpha/\pi)_3 = 1}.

In particular, we have the following corollary, which is all we will need:

Corollary 29 (When {2} is a cubic residue)

Let {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3} be a rational prime, {p > 3}. Write {p = \pi \overline{\pi}} with {\pi} primary. Then {2} is a cubic residue modulo {p} if and only if {\pi \equiv 1 \pmod 2}.

Proof: By cubic reciprocity:

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{2}{\pi} \right)_3 = \left( \frac{\pi}{2} \right)_3 \equiv \pi^{\frac13(N2-1)} \equiv \pi \pmod 2.

\Box

Now we give the proof of Theorem~27. Proof: First assume

\displaystyle  p = x^2+27y^2 = \left( x+3\sqrt 3 y \right)\left( x-3\sqrt 3 y \right).

Let {\pi = x + 3 \sqrt{-3} y = (x+3y) + 6y\omega} be primary, noting that {\pi \equiv 1 \pmod 2}. Now clearly {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3}, so done by corollary.

For the converse, assume {p \equiv 1 \pmod 3}, {p = \pi \overline{\pi}} with {\pi} primary and {\pi \equiv 1 \pmod 2}. If we set {\pi = a + b\omega} for integers {a} and {b}, then the fact that {\pi \equiv 1 \pmod 2} and {\pi \equiv -1 \pmod 3} is enough to imply that {6 \mid b} (check it!). Moreover,

\displaystyle  p = a^2-ab+b^2 = \left( a - \frac{1}{2} b \right)^2 + 27 \left( \frac16b \right)^2

as desired. \Box

7.2. Quartic reciprocity

This time we work in {\mathbb Z[i]}, for which there are four units {\pm 1}, {\pm i}. A prime is primary if {\pi \equiv 1 \pmod{2+2i}}; every prime not dividing {2 = -i(1+i)^2} has a unique associate which is primary. Then we can as before define

\displaystyle  \alpha^{\frac14(N\pi-1)} \equiv \left( \frac{\alpha}{\pi} \right)_4 \pmod{\pi} \in \left\{ \pm 1, \pm i \right\}

where {\pi} is primary, and {\alpha} is nonzero mod {\pi}. As before {p \equiv 1 \pmod 4}, {p = \pi\overline{\pi}} we have that {a} is a quartic residue modulo {p} if and only if {\left( a/\pi \right)_4 = 1} thanks to the isomorphism

\displaystyle  \mathbb Z[i] / \pi \mathbb Z[i] \cong \mathbb Z / p \mathbb Z.

Now we have

Theorem 30 (Quartic reciprocity)

If {\pi} and {\theta} are distinct primary primes in {\mathbb Z[i]} then

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{\theta}{\pi} \right)_4 = \left( \frac{\pi}{\theta} \right)_4 (-1)^{\frac{1}{16}(N\theta-1)(N\pi-1)}.

We also have supplementary laws that state that if {\pi = a+bi} is primary, then

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{i}{\pi} \right)_4 = i^{-\frac{1}{2}(a-1)} \qquad\text{and}\qquad \left( \frac{1+i}{\pi} \right)_4 = i^{\frac14(a-b-b^2-1)}.

Again, the first law handles units, and the second law handles the prime divisors of {2}. The corollary we care about this time in fact uses only the supplemental laws:

Corollary 31 (When {2} is a quartic residue)

Let {p \equiv 1 \pmod 4} be a prime, and put {p = \pi\overline{\pi}} with {\pi = a+bi} primary. Then

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{2}{\pi} \right)_4 = i^{-b/2}

and in particular {2} is a quartic residue modulo {p} if and only if {b \equiv 0 \pmod 8}.

Proof: Note that {2 = i^3(1+i)^2} and applying the above. Therefore

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{2}{\pi} \right)_4 = \left( \frac{i}{\pi} \right)_4^3 \left( \frac{1+i}{\pi} \right)_4^2 = i^{-\frac32(a-1)} \cdot i^{\frac12(a-b-b^2-1)} = i^{-(a-1) - \frac{1}{2} b(b+1)}.

Now we assumed {a+bi} is primary. We claim that

\displaystyle  a - 1 + \frac{1}{2} b^2 \equiv 0 \pmod 4.

Note that since {(a+bi)-1} was is divisible by {2+2i}, hence {N(2+2i)=8} divides {(a-1)^2+b^2}. Thus

\displaystyle  2(a-1) + b^2 \equiv 2(a-1) + (a-1)^2 \equiv (a-1)(a-3) \equiv 0 \pmod 8

since {a} is odd and {b} is even. Finally,

\displaystyle  \left( \frac{2}{\pi} \right)_4 = i^{-(a-1) - \frac{1}{2} b(b+1)} = i^{-\frac{1}{2} b + (a-1+\frac{1}{2} b^2)} \equiv i^{-\frac{1}{2} b} \pmod p.

\Box

From here we quickly deduce

Theorem 32 (On {p = x^2+64y^2})

If {p > 2} is prime, then {p = x^2+64y^2} if and only if {p \equiv 1 \pmod 4} and {2} is a quartic residue modulo {p}.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Positive Definite Quadratic Forms

  1. What exactly are “high-level notes”? Are those the notes that you took while you were reading the book? (minus polishing the write-up for this blog post I suppose)

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s